New Johnsonville, Tennessee

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New Johnsonville, Tennessee
Motto(s): 
"Friendly people, working together"[1]
Location in Humphreys County, Tennessee
Location in Humphreys County, Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°1′9″N 87°58′3″W / 36.01917°N 87.96750°W / 36.01917; -87.96750Coordinates: 36°1′9″N 87°58′3″W / 36.01917°N 87.96750°W / 36.01917; -87.96750
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountyHumphreys
Incorporated1949
Area
 • Total6.88 sq mi (17.83 km2)
 • Land5.14 sq mi (13.33 km2)
 • Water1.74 sq mi (4.50 km2)
Elevation
436 ft (133 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,951
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
1,874
 • Density364.24/sq mi (140.63/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
37134
Area code(s)931
FIPS code47-52820[4]
GNIS feature ID1295581[5]
Websitewww.cityofnewjohnsonville.com

New Johnsonville is a city in Humphreys County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 1,951 at the 2010 census.[6]

History[edit]

The history of New Johnsonville is rooted in the town of Johnsonville, which was once situated on the Tennessee River about 3 miles (5 km) downstream. Johnsonville, named for Andrew Johnson,[7] was most notably the site of the Battle of Johnsonville during the Civil War. Johnsonville was inundated by the Tennessee Valley Authority's construction of Kentucky Dam in 1944, and many of its residents moved to the current site of New Johnsonville, which was incorporated in 1949.[8]

Geography[edit]

New Johnsonville is located along the western border of Humphreys County at 36°1′9″N 87°58′3″W / 36.01917°N 87.96750°W / 36.01917; -87.96750 (36.019087, -87.967619).[9] It is on the east side of Kentucky Lake on the Tennessee River. U.S. Route 70 passes through the city, leading northeast 12 miles (19 km) to Waverly, the Humphreys county seat, and west 8 miles (13 km) to Camden.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.1 square miles (18.3 km2), of which 5.3 square miles (13.7 km2) are land and 1.8 square miles (4.6 km2), or 25.07%, are water.[6]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960559
197097073.5%
19801,82488.0%
19901,643−9.9%
20001,90515.9%
20101,9512.4%
2019 (est.)1,874[3]−3.9%
Sources:[10][11]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,905 people, 747 households, and 578 families residing in the city. The population density was 340.6 people per square mile (131.6/km2). There were 861 housing units at an average density of 154.0 per square mile (59.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.43% White, 1.26% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.10% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. 0.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 747 households, out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.6% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.6% were non-families. 19.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city the population was spread out, with 24.8% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $46,500, and the median income for a family was $51,406. Males had a median income of $41,161 versus $22,813 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,756. 8.8% of the population and 6.7% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 12.8% of those under the age of 18 and 5.2% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Economy[edit]

New Johnsonville is the location of the Johnsonville Combustion Turbine Plant,[12] formerly known as the Johnsonville Fossil Plant which operated from 1951 to 2017.[13] The plant generates electricity for the region and produces steam for the nearby Chemours plant which makes 25% of America's titanium oxide supply.[14]

Recreation[edit]

Johnsonville State Historic Park is located 4 miles (6 km) north of the town.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "City of New Johnsonville". City of New Johnsonville, Tennessee. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  6. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001): New Johnsonville city, Tennessee". American Factfinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 258 (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. p. 170. OCLC 1156805.
  8. ^ "Johnsonville History - Old and New". City of New Johnsonville. Archived from the original on October 17, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 4, 2012.
  11. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 11, 2013. Retrieved December 11, 2013.
  12. ^ "Johnsonville Combustion Turbine Plant". Tennessee Valley Authority. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  13. ^ Hicks, Mark (January 5, 2018). "TVA pulls plug on its oldest coal-fired plant in Humphreys County". The Leaf-Chronicle. Retrieved January 6, 2018.
  14. ^ "Full steam ahead: TVA co-generation plant saves 1,100 Chemours jobs". Chattanooga Times Free Press. December 6, 2016. Retrieved January 6, 2018.

External links[edit]