Talk:The Knobz

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The Knobz were a fairly typical pop band of the 1980's New Zealand scene. Best described in an article of the time as XTC meets The Knack. However, several things set them apart from their contemporaries. They were the very first rock band to have a self funded single hit the top 5 in New Zealand and, on their own label - Bunk Records! They were self managed and toured extensively with good chart success for 2 singles and later, an album - Sudden Exposure. They were also a great live act and always entertained to the max. The band toured New Zealand before leaving for Australia in 1980 and they played the (mainly) Sydney scene with other acts of the period such as the Divinyls, Men at Work, Swanee, Moving Pictures etc. The band had disagreements over their keyboard player and three members left.Kiwi imports drummer Tim Powles (ex Flight X-7) and also the bass player from the same band, Warwick Keay joined their original songwriter Kevin Fogarty. The Knobz are long gone now but looking back, they epitomised the early 80s period when punk still held a slender audience and new romantic was starting to hit. Criticism leveled at The Knobz during and since their time was often unfair and not seen in the context of the times.They headlined Sweetwaters Friday night kiwi special and had 80,000 fans singing CULTURE. Many of the critics have been players from the same period and obviously people who perhaps envied the Knobz chart successes. They did break new ground and were a powerful live act.

Is the above a draft?PeterMan844 (talk) 03:11, 5 April 2014 (UTC)